System Of A Down Live

The DDevil Is So Lovely

08/09/2012 - Comcast Center - Mansfield, MA

 

Lineup:

Daron Malakian: Guitar, Vocals
John Dolmayan: Drums
Shavo Odadjian: Bass, Backing Vocals
Serj Tankian: Vocals, Guitar, Keyboards

 

Other Performers:

  • Deftones

 

Setlist:

  1. Prison Song
  2. Soldier Side - Intro
  3. B.Y.O.B.
  4. Needles
  5. Deer Dance
  6. Radio/Video
  7. Hypnotize
  8. Question!
  9. Suggestions
  10. Psycho
  11. Chop Suey!
  12. Lonely Day
  13. Bounce
  14. Kill Rock 'n Roll
  15. Lost in Hollywood
  16. Forest
  17. Holy Mountains
  18. Aerials
  19. Tentative
  20. Cigaro
  21. Suite-Pee
  22. War?
  23. Toxicity
  24. Sugar

 

Sources:

Source
Format
Quality
Complete
Length
AMT#1???9.0Yes???

 

Notes:

  • 2012 North American Tour.
  • AMT#1: Right-Cam.  Not currently circulating.
  • Daron played a few notes of The Allman Brothers' song "Jessica" at the end of "Hypnotize".

 

Transcript:

 

Pics:

PhotobucketPhotobucket

 

Concert review: System of a Down, Trusts Stadium

By Chris Schulz

With his foot-long goatee and oversized hockey shirt, bassist Shavo Odadjian is stalking around the stage, staring down a rabid moshpit with the whites of his eyes.

Drummer John Dolmayan's arms are flailing as guitarist Daron Malakian belts out one riff after another, tipping his top hat to the crowd as he barks like a dog one minute and wails like a banshee the next.

Leading this thrash-metal circus is ringleader Serj Tankian, the Lebanese-born, American-raised Kiwi resident jabbing his finger in the air to punctuate his politically-infused rants that veer between operatic singalongs, spoken word sound bites and comical yapping.

How good is it to see System of a Down back in action?

The Los Angeles-based quartet haven't been here since 2005's Big Day Out, a performance marred by moshpit stoppages and underdone prog-rock experimentalism on the back of that year's ambitious double album release Mezmerize and Hypnotize.

But System proved to be in the form of the careers at a sold out Trusts Stadium, barely pausing for breath as they ripped through nearly 30 songs during an intense 100-minute show in front of what felt like a hometown crowd.

Like other 90s acts on the comeback trail, System - who spent three years on hiatus before regrouping in 2009 - aren't playing new material, instead cherry-picking hits from across their five albums.

Fans knew every word, from the opening sludge metal flurry of Prison Song, to Psycho's barked chorus and Tankian's furiously fast spitting over the military stomp of Revenga. Try doing that when you've had a few beers.

Not many metal acts can get away with mixing up so many styles, like the ridiculous pop chorus of BYOB ("Everybody's going to the party, have a real good time"), or the salsa breakdown in Radio/Video and the lounge room balladeering in Hypnotize.

But it all comes backed by some of the best thrash-metal riffage around. Tracks from their aggressive breakthrough album, 2001's Toxicity, turned Trusts Stadium into a giant trampoline and human sweatbox, like a frenetic Needles, the soaring Deer Dance, Bounce's perfectly-timed grooves and supercharged highlight Chop Suey!

That song saw a group of girls on the Trusts Stadium balcony perform coordinated dance moves, rubbing their eyes and cutting their throats in time with Tankian's lyrics.

And it was that kind of show, with strangers moshing together and high fiving each other over their favourite songs.

As set highlight Aerials kicked the show into overdrive, 4000 fans - half of them going shirtless to escape the sweltering temperatures - tried out their best Tankian impressions, prompting the obviously chuffed singer to remark, "I'm proud to call this place home".

After a performance like that, System of a Down are welcome back anytime.

By Chris Schulz

With his foot-long goatee and oversized hockey shirt, bassist Shavo Odadjian is stalking around the stage, staring down a rabid moshpit with the whites of his eyes.

Drummer John Dolmayan's arms are flailing as guitarist Daron Malakian belts out one riff after another, tipping his top hat to the crowd as he barks like a dog one minute and wails like a banshee the next.

Leading this thrash-metal circus is ringleader Serj Tankian, the Lebanese-born, American-raised Kiwi resident jabbing his finger in the air to punctuate his politically-infused rants that veer between operatic singalongs, spoken word sound bites and comical yapping.

How good is it to see System of a Down back in action?

The Los Angeles-based quartet haven't been here since 2005's Big Day Out, a performance marred by moshpit stoppages and underdone prog-rock experimentalism on the back of that year's ambitious double album release Mezmerize and Hypnotize.

But System proved to be in the form of the careers at a sold out Trusts Stadium, barely pausing for breath as they ripped through nearly 30 songs during an intense 100-minute show in front of what felt like a hometown crowd.

Like other 90s acts on the comeback trail, System - who spent three years on hiatus before regrouping in 2009 - aren't playing new material, instead cherry-picking hits from across their five albums.

Fans knew every word, from the opening sludge metal flurry of Prison Song, to Psycho's barked chorus and Tankian's furiously fast spitting over the military stomp of Revenga. Try doing that when you've had a few beers.

Not many metal acts can get away with mixing up so many styles, like the ridiculous pop chorus of BYOB ("Everybody's going to the party, have a real good time"), or the salsa breakdown in Radio/Video and the lounge room balladeering in Hypnotize.

But it all comes backed by some of the best thrash-metal riffage around. Tracks from their aggressive breakthrough album, 2001's Toxicity, turned Trusts Stadium into a giant trampoline and human sweatbox, like a frenetic Needles, the soaring Deer Dance, Bounce's perfectly-timed grooves and supercharged highlight Chop Suey!

That song saw a group of girls on the Trusts Stadium balcony perform coordinated dance moves, rubbing their eyes and cutting their throats in time with Tankian's lyrics.

And it was that kind of show, with strangers moshing together and high fiving each other over their favourite songs.

As set highlight Aerials kicked the show into overdrive, 4000 fans - half of them going shirtless to escape the sweltering temperatures - tried out their best Tankian impressions, prompting the obviously chuffed singer to remark, "I'm proud to call this place home".

After a performance like that, System of a Down are welcome back anytime.

Review:

 

  • Last best show: System of a Down/Deftones at Comcast

    That Deftones and System of a Down survived the ’90s nu-metal fad is not surprising. Both wielded fierce power and showered the Comcast Center crowd last night with unrivaled emotion and melody, proving why the two West Coast bands have separated from the pack over the ensuing decades.

    The massive double bill at the Mansfield shed was one of just nine North American shows.  Deftones’ original bassist, Chi Cheng, is tragically still lying in a coma, but the Sacramento group, with Quicksand bassist Sergio Vega filling in, has reconstituted itself more than aptly.  Whether blaring the beautiful hard rock of “Diamond Eyes” from the band’s 2010 album of the same name or blasting through early classics like “Engine No. 9” and “Root” from their 1994 debut, “Adrenaline,” vocalist Chino Moreno and company were in top form.

    The dreamy “Digital Bath,” from the band’s landmark 2000 disc, “White Pony,” washed over the crowd like a thick fog, crashing and receding with spine-chilling crescendos and deep, dark valleys. And therein lies the dynamic power of Deftones: the unrivaled ability to enrapture its audience whether tinkling quietly through a soft bridge, muscling through a power chord-driven verse or crushing a violent, abrasive hardcore chorus.

    It was a tight, one-hour set from the influential, Grammy-winning band that also included favorites, “Be Quiet and Drive (Far Away)” and “My Own Summer (Shove It),” from 1997’s “Around the Fur,” as well as their biggest hit, “Change (In the House of Flies).” They also unveiled a new song, “Rosemary,” from their forthcoming, as-yet-untitled album.

    System of a Down matched Deftones’ power and prowess in a set that was among the loudest I’ve ever witnessed – and that includes shows by notorious decibel-pushing bands like Motorhead, Nirvana and Iron Maiden. My ears rang as I left and my head still feels like it’s filled with cotton today.  But that’s a good thing. Especially when the loudness was tied to vintage SOAD cuts like “B.Y.O.B.” – for which the band won a 2006 Grammy - “Question” and “Toxicity.”

    With no new album to promote, SOAD culled from all five of its discs, exploding in off-beat punk on “Chop Suey” and inciting beer hall-like sing-a-longs on infectious songs like “Lost in Hollywood” and “Aerials.”  Like Deftones, the group of Armenian-Americans are diverse, talented musicians. They’re as comfortable playing the heaviest of metal, injecting jazzy breakdowns into the fray or dabbling in the folk rock of their homeland.  Free of the pressures of record promotion and long-term touring obligations, the four longtime comrades seemed like they were having a blast, delivering an intoxicating blitz of prog-metal glory.

    Now if I can just get a little bit of my hearing back ….


    By Dave Wedge

 

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